In Tokyo, Japanese researchers have discovered an entire new angle on wireless technology – beaming energy through space. Their new discovery is an essential step towards engineers’ capacity to produce solar power in space for utilization on Earth.

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) reports that researchers attained the transmission of energy by utilizing microwaves to convey 1.8 kilowatts of power with awesome exactness to a focus that is 170 feet away. This denotes the first run through such a high yield of power has been exchanged by means of microwaves to such a little target.

A Discovery News report said, “While the distance was not huge, the technology could pave the way for mankind to eventually tap the vast amount of solar energy available in space and use it here on Earth,”.

“This was the first time anyone has managed to send a high output of nearly two kilowatts of electric power via microwaves to a small target, using a delicate directivity control device,” said a representative for JAXA. But it could take decades before we see practical application of the technology—maybe in the 2040s or later. There are a number of challenges to overcome, such as how to send huge structures into space, how to construct them and how to maintain them.”

Satellites, for example, the ISS routinely gather solar power for their own particular functions, yet sending solar-generated power down to Earth for utilization has not appeared practical until JAXA’s disclosure. JAXA scientists imagine a future in which satellites conveying solar panel boards and antennas will send sun oriented shut down to beneficiaries on Earth from around 22,300 miles up.

Solar power is less demanding to gather in space than on Earth because of the absence of impedance from mists and the capacity of a satellite to invest additional time in daylight.